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3 bedroom detached house for sale

Niton, Isle of Wight.

Sold STC £299,950

Property Description

Key features

  • Character and charm in abundance
  • 3 Bedrooms
  • 2 Reception rooms
  • Off road parking for multiple vehicles
  • Conservatory
  • Landscaped terrace gardens
  • 2 X Shower rooms
  • Oilf fired central heating

Full description

If you long to live in a quiet village which boasts a range of amenities normally only found in a town and you fancy owning a house that is unlike any other, then you should not hesitate to view Westcliff Lodge in Niton.

Niton's amenities include a mini supermarket, a pharmacy, a doctors' surgery, a post office with cafe and tea gardens, a hairdresser, an internationally recognised pottery, a library and an Aladdin's cave of a shop selling everything from flowers to screwdrivers. There are three churches, two pubs, a primary school with a pre-school, a library and a village hall housing an amazing range of activities and societies.

From the house you can walk to the sea at Castlehaven, a quiet cove with space to store dinghies, walk from there along the cliff to the Lighthouse and on to Watershoot Bay. 100 yards from the house you can pick up the cliff path taking you east towards Ventnor or west to Blackgang and beyond with show stopping views out to the Needles.

The house itself is stone built, some 200 years old and was formerly the gate house to Westcliff. An 'upside down' house it has its day time accommodation on the first floor which is at entry level from Westcliff's drive. The entrance hall still has a flag stone floor. Doors off lead to the sitting room, the dining room and a double bedroom with the shower room exactly opposite. The sitting room is a dual aspect room with striking arched windows. a feature shared with the dining room.
Situated off the dining room is the kitchen which is fitted with a range of light wood wall and base units with built in fridge/freezer and oven space. Double glazed patio doors lead to the conservatory. With views across the garden to the channel the double glazed conservatory provides a fantastic addition to the accommodation and one from which you can enjoy watching the local wildlife which includes red squirrels, badgers and many wild birds so prevalent in this location. Sea views are also enjoyed from bedroom one which again has the attractive arched windows of the sitting room and dining room. The shower room completes this floor and is equipped with a glazed shower enclosure, low level w.c. and pedestal wash basin.

A twisting stone staircase takes you down to the ground floor lobby which has an unusual brick arched ceiling and is home to the rear of what is believed to have been the old bake oven. Turn left and the first door will take you into bedroom 2 which houses the front of the bread oven. This room is believed to have been the kitchen at earlier times. The second door in the corridor opens to a recently built shower room with wash basin and w/c. From the shower room another door gives access to a cobbled yard leading to the lower part of the garden. Turning right from the lobby would have taken you to a storage area off which another door opens into bedroom 3 which currently doubles up as a computer room.

The rear garden is arranged over several levels with a variety of patio and shingle areas well placed to make the most of the garden. The major part of the garden is laid to lawn with an array of mature plants, shrubs and trees providing contrast together with inset flower beds. There are a number of winding paths throughout the garden which provide easy access to the different levels. Accessed from the garden is the boiler room which doubles as a good garden store in addition to the two timber sheds situated at the rear of the garden. Vehicular access is via the driveway to Westcliff where there is a gravel parking area for up to three vehicles situated adjacent to the lodge.

This is a truly unique opportunity to purchase a notable stone detached house with intriguing heritage that has not been on the market for in the region of 40 years, viewing is most highly recommended.

EPC Rating E.

Entry Level
Entrance Hall
Sitting Room 141 X 138
Dining Room 143 X 107
Kitchen 11 X 911
Conservatory 134 max X 71
Bedroom 1 141 X 137
Shower Room

Ground Floor
Lobby through to corridor
Bedroom 2 123 X 95
Bedroom 3/Study 134 X 8
Shower Room
Store Room 138 X 58

Owner's Narrative

Westcliff Lodge
As its name implies, Westcliff Lodge was until the mid twentieth century part of the estate of Westcliff, Westcliff has a history of prestigious owners. The auctioneers' booklet prepared for its sale in 1912 states that the house was occupied by the Earl of Litchfield for a considerable period and subsequently by the Viscountess Downe and by Bishop Boyd Carpenter. The house was the subject of one of George Brannon's famous prints and glimpses of the lodge can be seen in another print this time featuring the other houses in the area. Newport Museum has on display a delightful aqua print of the lodge. The auctioneer's brochure of 1912 refers to "an excellent six roomed lodge at the entrance". The auctioneer's brochure for the sale of the 1955 is more specific. It speaks of a "Georgian Lodge" and lists two bedrooms and a sitting room at the drive level and at road level a living room with kitchen and a scullery, workshop and store and an outside W.C. The remains of the W.C. can still be found in the garden shed!.

Original residents of the lodge were part of the significant number of staff employed at the main house which had extensive servants quarters and even its own gas generating plant. The Lodge was occupied by one of the gardeners to Westcliff which had substantial kitchen gardens and espaliered fruit trees. It is probably a fair assumption that the Lodge supplied bread to the big house given the size of the bread oven still to be seen on the ground floor of the property. A small fitting on its North wall is evidence of a bell operated from the gate. Gate keeping was clearly one of its main duties.

The address Barrack Shute harks back to the existence of a barracks on the far side of the road and a cannon ball was found in the garden and identified as dating from the Napoleonic wars. When the late husband of a present owner first explored the garden, he moved a small slab only to hear a distant plop. He had found the inadequately safeguarded well, from it he pulled out 30 feet of lead piping and part of the original pump inscribed with the figures 1814 so we are now celebrating the 200th birthday of the well which is probably pretty close to the date of the house. My late husband was lucky not to have gone headfirst down the 30 feet with 16 feet of water at its base. Rescue would have been impossible. At the foot of the garden is a similarly constructed ice house but this feature is still part of the property of the main house.

Not only was there a bread oven on the ground floor but exploration in a covered up fireplace revealed a perfect if somewhat rusty kitchen range with remain of food still in it !. My current partner has painstakingly restored this and it occupies pride of place in the present dining room. The origins of the house far outdate green wheelie pins and an early find was the old midden containing many fragments of decorated china.

The house originally will have been no more than two up two down with a toilet in what is now the garden shed. Over the years (just when we do not know) a new hallway was added and with it what is now the dining room. A visit to the capacious loft reveals the way the roof was extended pretty early on and there are also the remains of the other chimneys. House detectives would have a field day!. It is this first extension that explains the thickness of the wall between the dining room and the upstairs bedroom, which has allowed for shelving to be built in each room in the space originally occupied by the front window. The two portholes were dredged up from the River Medway in Kent!.

The kitchen and the conservatory were added during the occupancy of the present owners as was the small patio.

The aquatint in Newport museum shows the cottage some time in the late Victorian era depicting the street wall without the window on the stairs that exists today. We wonder were the children the family of the gardener or perhaps they came from Highcliff which was also part of the Westcliff Estate.



These property details are set out as a general outline only and do not constitute any part of an Offer or Contract. Any services, equipment, fittings or central heating systems have not been tested and no warranty is given or implied that these are in working order. Buyers are advised to obtain verification from their solicitor or surveyor. Fixtures, fittings and other items are not included unless specifically described. All measurements, distances and areas are approximate and for guidance only. Room measurements are taken to be the nearest 10cm and prospective buyers are advised to check these for any particular purpose, e.g. Fitted carpets and furniture.

Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs)

Listing History

Added on Rightmove:
08 March 2014

Map & Street View

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